Jury court – Trial Jury http://trial-jury.org/ Mon, 06 Dec 2021 12:09:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.2 https://trial-jury.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/cropped-icon-32x32.png Jury court – Trial Jury http://trial-jury.org/ 32 32 Child molester appears in county court after jury found him guilty of assaulting his sister-in-law | Bendigo Advertiser https://trial-jury.org/child-molester-appears-in-county-court-after-jury-found-him-guilty-of-assaulting-his-sister-in-law-bendigo-advertiser/ Mon, 06 Dec 2021 05:30:00 +0000 https://trial-jury.org/child-molester-appears-in-county-court-after-jury-found-him-guilty-of-assaulting-his-sister-in-law-bendigo-advertiser/

news, news-locales, bendigo, court, abuse, child abuse, sexual assault

A WOMAN who was sexually assaulted as a child by her brother-in-law confronted the man in court, saying his betrayal had traumatized her. The 37-year-old central Victorian-era man was stoic when the woman told county court she was the “strongest and most confident little girl” before the abuse. “You left me mentally crippled and completely broken,” the woman told the man on Monday. “You stole my childhood. I’ll never get it back.” Read more court: Prison for the man who attacked his partner in Bendigo A county court jury last month found the man guilty of indecent acts with a child under 16 and of sexual penetration of a child under the age of 16. the man started abusing his sister-in-law when the girl was about 10 years old and he was in her early 20s. He and his wife – the girl’s sister – lived on the same property as the 10-year-old. In the first abuse, the girl was massaging the man’s back when he told her to massage her legs. He kept telling the girl to raise her hands higher before grabbing one of his and placing it on her groin. The girl withdrew her hand and moved away from the bed. He told the 10-year-old not to tell anyone because it was just an accident. About a month later, the man drove the girl to a rural area. He allowed her to drive his vehicle, asking her to sit on his lap while she used the steering wheel. The man first held the girl by the waist before starting to sexually assault her. The girl maneuvered the car in a deliberate attempt to crash it into a hollow in the road. The man applied both the foot brake and the hand brake, causing the vehicle to skid to the side. After the vehicle stopped moving, the girl told the man she no longer wanted to drive and settled back into the passenger seat. A few months later, the girl helped her sister to babysit the couple’s newborn daughter. When the 10-year-old girl’s sister left to help with some of the farm chores, the girl took care of the baby with the man. Read more court: Castlemaine man will not be jailed for helping his father kill himself They were all lying on a bed, with the baby between them, when the 10-year-old fell asleep. The girl woke up with the man lying behind her in a “spoon” position. The girl froze and pretended she was still sleeping. The man sexually assaulted the girl. Court documents say the girl remained in tears throughout the assault. The latest incident happened about four years later when the girl’s parents were away. She was sleeping in her parents’ bed when the naked man positioned himself behind her. He put his arm around her chest before sexually assaulting her. The 14-year-old yelled at the man to get rid of her, but he told her to go back to sleep. The girl was crying as she moved away from him. The man stood up, apologized and told him not to tell anyone. After the incident, the girl disclosed the abuse to her cousin. Her cousin informed her school, which then passed the information on to the girl’s parents. The family of the 14-year-old decided to process the disclosure internally, in an attempt to prevent the man from taking his wife and young daughter away as he had threatened. The family had a meeting to deal with the complaint, where the young girl refused to disclose further the matter and even asked what she needs to do to continue her relationship with her sister and niece. The girl was eventually forced to apologize to the accused in person. A few years later, the man called the victim where he apologized for the offense and apologized for his conduct. When the girl’s sister separated from the man, the victim felt comfortable revealing the abuse to the police. Read other court: Lease denied for man charged with carjacking offenses The victim read a statement in county court on Monday. She held back tears as she spoke of her trauma. “You let me look you in the face and say sorry,” the woman said. “It was one of the lowest times of my life.” I don’t think I’ve ever felt so empty. For so many years, I was forced to hide the pain. I trusted you like a brother and you broke my heart. “The girl’s mother also read a victim impact statement. She said she had the” overwhelming feeling of heartbreaking guilt. ” He betrayed my family in the most evil way, “the woman said. Defense lawyer Emma Strugnell said the court’s character references spoke of the man’s” caring and genuine nature. ” The defense lawyer also admitted that the man who brought the case to court, he would not receive any discount for his plea. Judge Greg Lyon praised the victim for his integrity and courage in reading of his statement in court. Judge Lyon adjourned the sentencing hearing to a date yet to be determined. The 37-year-old has been remanded in custody. If you or someone you know needs for support, contact the Center Against Sexual Assault – Central Victoria at 54 41 0430 or the Sexual Assault Cri sis Line at 1800 806 292. Our reporters work hard to provide local and up-to-date news to the community. Here’s how you can access our trusted content:

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The Mississippi abortion case and the fragile legitimacy of the Supreme Court https://trial-jury.org/the-mississippi-abortion-case-and-the-fragile-legitimacy-of-the-supreme-court/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 15:06:18 +0000 https://trial-jury.org/the-mississippi-abortion-case-and-the-fragile-legitimacy-of-the-supreme-court/

The legal landscape of the past few weeks and months has prompted questions about who and what are legitimate interpreters and performers of the law and what happens when you take charge of the law. Mississippi and other states have taken recent Supreme Court staffing changes as an invitation to challenge constitutional court rulings on abortion, and those states now appear likely to prevail.

Illustration by João Fazenda

In oral argument in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, last Wednesday the three Liberal justices often appeared to deliver funeral chants, as if they had accepted a loss and spoke for posterity. Mississippi’s ban on abortions after fifteen weeks of pregnancy, which boldly flouts court precedents setting the limit at around twenty-four weeks, is expected to be upheld by conservative judges. The arguments offered little reason to hope that Roe v. Wade will be reaffirmed; the most recent Conservative judges, Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett, signaled no qualms about dismissing Roe as ill-decided, which would make a majority of at least five. At a time when the legitimacy of the Court seems extremely fragile, it is revealing that the majority response to the challenge of the supremacy of Court decisions appears to be acquiescence and approval.

The open challenge to the authority of the Court may largely reflect a spirit of legal self-help that runs through the country. For example, we normally think the role of law enforcement belongs to states, not random neighbors, but two recent homicide cases have appeared to involve the vigilante. On November 19, in Kenosha, Wisconsin, Kyle Rittenhouse was acquitted of all charges for shooting three people, including two fatally, during anti-racial justice protests in August 2020. Rittenhouse, who was then ten- seven years old, had traveled to Kenosha from his home in Illinois. with a semi-automatic weapon, allegedly to keep the peace and prevent the destruction of property. The jury concluded that he shot his victims in self-defense because he reasonably feared his own death or grievous bodily harm.

On November 24, a Georgia jury rejected a self-defense request, dismissing the murder convictions of three white men who, in February 2020, hunted down and shot dead Ahmaud Arbery, a black man who was jogging. The defendants claimed that they prosecuted Arbery on suspicion that he had committed burglaries in the area and that the fatal shots were fired in response to the fact that he allegedly took a rifle that one of them pointed at him. They attempted to justify the prosecution by citing a Georgian citizen arrest law that allowed anyone with “reasonable and probable grounds to suspect” to arrest an alleged fugitive on the run. The law has since been repealed, but similar laws have long existed in almost all states.

Any self-defense revivalism today goes hand in hand with an increased capacity of private citizens to bear arms in public. The Supreme Court is considering the most important gun rights case since ruling over a decade ago that the Second Amendment guarantees an individual’s right to keep handguns at home to defend themselves. On November 3, he heard arguments challenging a New York law that allows a license to carry handguns concealed outside the home, but only on presentation of “just cause.” The perverse and self-fulfilling truth is that as gun ownership has proliferated, an individual’s claim to need a gun for protection has become more plausible. But the idea that ordinary people should carry guns stems directly from the tradition that advocates the use of force by private citizens to uphold the law, instead of – or even against – the state. Looking at the history of carrying guns in early America, conservative judges seem likely to extend the right to carry guns to guns on the streets.

The spirit of vigilance is also noticeable in a court case considering a Texas law that bans abortions after about the sixth week of pregnancy. SB 8 does not specifically authorize state officials to enforce the law, allowing only private citizens to do so, suing an abortion provider for damages of ten thousand dollars for each procedure performed – this to which several judges referred, during the pleadings of November 1, as a “bonus”. The law was designed to avoid being challenged in federal court. Arguments revolved around whether a state could effectively shield unconstitutional laws from review by federal courts simply by delegating their application to the general public. An amicus brief filed by civil rights organizations linked SB 8 to “the violent history of citizen arrests and racist vigilantism in the South”.

For the most part, even conservative judges seemed offended by the Texas ploy, not least because Texas had to admit that liberal states could use the same enforcement regime to isolate unconstitutional gun rights restrictions from any challenge. . The court will likely push back and allow abortion providers to pursue a constitutional challenge of SB 8 in federal court. But the terrain on which such a challenge could have ultimately succeeded will have changed dramatically. Unconstitutional when it came into effect, SB 8’s six-week ban may well be constitutional in several months, even if its enforcement mechanism is not, if the court issues a ruling in Dobbs that overturns Roe. . Yet, notwithstanding what happened publicly during Dobbs’ pleadings, a compromise could still be found behind the scenes, in which Chief Justice John Roberts allows for the maintenance of a fundamental right to abortion, while allowing the Mississippi and other states to ban abortion as early as fifteen weeks, and leave it for another day to decide how much before it’s too early.

During last week’s arguments, Judge Sonia Sotomayor lamented: “Will this institution survive the stench that this creates in the public perception that the Constitution and its reading are only political acts? The stench, so to speak, is a byproduct of the unresolved ambivalence within the legal system about who has the power to decide what the law should be. Conservative judges seemed eager to “return” the abortion issue to the people. But the point of a fundamental constitutional right is that it should not be at the mercy of the people, especially when the composition of the Court itself has been altered by political means for this purpose. The spectacle of states brazenly defying the Court’s constitutional precedents, followed closely by the Court’s rejection of those precedents to make illegal actions legal after all, would effectively communicate that the Supreme Court is not, in fact, supreme. . ??

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Clinton County Court of Common Pleas calendar December 6-12. 10 | News, Sports, Jobs https://trial-jury.org/clinton-county-court-of-common-pleas-calendar-december-6-12-10-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 05:21:09 +0000 https://trial-jury.org/clinton-county-court-of-common-pleas-calendar-december-6-12-10-news-sports-jobs/

LOCK HAVEN – The following schedule for Dec. 6-Dec. 10 is provided by the Clinton County Court of Common Pleas and is subject to change based on the needs of the court system. Hearings on family relationships are also restricted and are not listed.

Abbreviations – CR stands for criminal proceedings; CV civil proceedings.

The names listed first are the names of the defendants and the names towards the end of each designation with the “/” in between are the last names of the lawyers involved in the cases.

CPM is for hearings before Judge Craig Miller. MFS is for hearings before Judge Michael Salisbury. DA stands for District Attorney and PD stands for Public Defender. ARD is a first offender probation program. Revo stands for revocation hearings of various types and PWV is probation without verdict.

Monday 6 December

8:30

MFS-Curtis Sherwood Flather, CR, prob. Revo., DA / Decker

CPM-Kristen Elizabeth Coleman, CR, prob. Revo., DA / W. Jeffrey Yates

CPM-John Stephen Epps, Jr., CR, Gagnon II, DA / Johnson

CPM-Patrick Ryan Shady, CR-Parole / Prob. Revo. CR-Arraignment, DA / Decker

CPM-Ryan Stuart Keen, CR, prob. Rev., DA / Johnson

CPM-Lily Ann Dugan, CR, Sentence, DA / Decker

CPM-Francis E. Winkelman, III, CR, rev. Parole, DA / Decker

CPM-Morgan Jo Workman, prob. Revo., DA / Decker

MFS-Ryan Thomas Koch, CR, Arraignment, DA / Dance Drier

CPM-Thomas Rolland Fields, III, CR, prob. Rev., DA / Johnson

CPM-Brian Matthew Nestor, CR, Rev. Parole, DA / Johnson

MFS-Kyleigh Dawn Kinley, CR, prob. Revo., DA / Lindsay

MFS-Jason T. Knarr, CR, Sentencing, DA / Johnson

MFS-Haashim Isshan Pierson, CR, potential advocacy, DA / Lingle

CPM-Donald Lee Adams, CR, Sentencing, DA / Lindsay

CPM-Damien Christopher Major, CR, Sentencing, DA / Johnson

CPM-Bryan Keith Eldred, CR, Sentencing, DA / Lingle

MFS-Alycia Autumn Rose, CR, Sentence, DA / Lindsay

CPM-Darryl Wayne McDermit, Sr., CR, Sentencing, Decker

MFS-Timothy William Kunes, CR, Sentencing, DA / Gregory E. Davidson

MFS-Caleb Wayne Stern, CR, Status Hrg., DA / Johnson

CPM-Daryl Adrian Durost, CR, prob. Revo., DA / Decker

MFS-Kyle Alan Wagner, CR, Further Hrg., DA / Lingle / Johnson

CPM-Neyvid Helena, CR, ARD Revo., DA / None

CPM-Robert Lee Dugan, Jr., CR, prob. Rev., DA / Johnson

MFS-Edgar John Willits, Jr., CR, Sentencing, DA / Lingle

11:00

CPM-Helina Abebe, CR, Sentencing, DA / Lingle

MFS-Behavioral Health Tribunal

11:30 a.m.

MFS-Veterans Affairs Jury Room & Ct. Rm. # 2

1:00 p.m.

CPM-Carlos Manuel Pacheco Cortes, CR, Advocacy, DA / Pulizzi, DA / Andrea Pulizzi

MFS-Court-Room Treatment & Ct. Rm. # 1

Wednesday December 8

8:30

CPM-Timothy Alva Neff, CR, PCRA / Evidence, DA / Lingle

Thursday December 9

8:30

MFS-Rodney L. Rupert v. Teddi Nicole Young, CV, Equitable Relief, Pro Se / Pro Se

9h00

MFS-Sandra Vs. Jeffrey Krape, CV, Preventing Asset Dissipation, Sharon E. McLaughlin

Friday December 10

8:30

MFS-Aaron Lee Clark, CR, JT, ADA Rosamilia / Rude

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massage table, unfolded in the yard https://trial-jury.org/massage-table-unfolded-in-the-yard/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 02:46:00 +0000 https://trial-jury.org/massage-table-unfolded-in-the-yard/

NEW YORK (AP) – A green folding massage table used by financier Jeffrey Epstein was brought to a Manhattan courtroom and set up in front of a jury on Friday to bolster claims he had partnered with the British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell for sexually exploiting underage victims.

The theatrical blossoming in Manhattan federal court, courtesy of an investigator wearing rubber gloves, was intended to corroborate the testimony of a key accuser during Maxwell’s ongoing sexual abuse trial, alleging that massages were used as a pretext for sexual encounters with Epstein which sometimes included Maxwell.

A witness who said the abuse began when he was 14 described seeing a massage table in a “massage room” which police said was in the same place where they recovered one in Epstein’s mansion in Palm Beach, Florida in 2005.

A police officer testified that investigators also seized files, computers and sex toys – a photo of which was shown to the jury – from the residence.

Prosecutors showed jurors a videotape of police from the residence which captured footage of nude photos on the walls – a setting which federal prosecutors say is evidence of a sexualized atmosphere encouraged by Maxwell to pressure the victims.

The evidence was presented over defense objections, calling it prejudicial. Defense attorney Bobbi Sternheim accused prosecutors of trying to unfairly portray Epstein’s house as a “home of debauchery.”

Prosecutors alleged the British socialite treated teenage girls by taking them shopping and going to the movies, telling them about their lives and encouraging them to accept Epstein’s financial aid. The government also says she helped create a sexually charged atmosphere by talking about sex with the girls and telling them about Epstein’s alleged sexualized massages.

Maxwell, 59, denies the allegations against her and her lawyers say prosecutors are prosecuting her because they cannot try Epstein, who committed suicide in prison before he can be tried. She was Epstein’s former girlfriend and, later, his employee.

The accuser, using the pseudonym “Jane” to protect her privacy, said earlier this week that on her first visit to Epstein’s home, she was disturbed by “certain paintings of, like, nude women or half-naked women “. In the massage room in a master bedroom shared by Epstein and Maxwell, the couple were “showing me, you know, what they like, what – you know, what men like, what women like.”

Also on Friday, Epstein’s former housekeeper Juan Patricio Alessi returned to the witness stand to face cross-examination on her testimony that “Jane” and another woman who accused Epstein of having her. sexually assaulted as a teenager were repeat visitors to the Palm Beach mansion, where Maxwell was “the hostess.”

A lawyer for Maxwell sought to discredit Alessi – who worked for Epstein from 1990 to 2002 – by confronting him with testimony from a civil case that the defense said was inconsistent with his testimony at trial.

Alessi said Friday that none of the many young women who visited the Florida home alerted him to any misconduct.

“I wish they had done it because I would have done something,” he said.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

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Evidence at Maxwell trial: massage table, unfolded in court https://trial-jury.org/evidence-at-maxwell-trial-massage-table-unfolded-in-court/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 23:36:00 +0000 https://trial-jury.org/evidence-at-maxwell-trial-massage-table-unfolded-in-court/

Updated 7 minutes ago

NEW YORK (AP) – A green folding massage table used by financier Jeffrey Epstein was brought into a Manhattan courtroom and set up in front of a jury on Friday to bolster claims he had partnered with the British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell for sexually exploiting underage victims.

The theatrical blossoming in Manhattan federal court, courtesy of an investigator wearing rubber gloves, was intended to corroborate the testimony of a key accuser during Maxwell’s ongoing sexual abuse trial, alleging that massages were used as a pretext for sexual encounters with Epstein which sometimes included Maxwell.

A witness who said the abuse began when he was 14 described seeing a massage table in a “massage room” which police said was in the same place where they recovered one in Epstein’s mansion in Palm Beach, Florida in 2005.

A police officer testified that investigators also seized files, computers and sex toys – a photo of which was shown to the jury – from the residence.

Prosecutors showed jurors a videotape of police from the residence which captured footage of nude photos on the walls – a setting which federal prosecutors say is evidence of a sexualized atmosphere encouraged by Maxwell to pressure the victims.

The evidence was presented over defense objections, calling it prejudicial. Defense attorney Bobbi Sternheim accused prosecutors of trying to unfairly portray Epstein’s house as a “home of debauchery.”

Prosecutors alleged the British socialite treated teenage girls by taking them shopping and going to the movies, telling them about their lives and encouraging them to accept Epstein’s financial aid. The government also says she helped create a sexually charged atmosphere by talking about sex with the girls and telling them about Epstein’s alleged sexualized massages.

Maxwell, 59, denies the allegations against her and her lawyers say prosecutors are prosecuting her because they cannot try Epstein, who committed suicide in prison before he can be tried. She was Epstein’s former girlfriend and, later, his employee.

The accuser, using the pseudonym “Jane” to protect her privacy, said earlier this week that on her first visit to Epstein’s home, she was disturbed by “certain paintings of, like, naked women or half-naked women “. In the massage room in a master bedroom shared by Epstein and Maxwell, the couple were “showing me, you know, what they like, what – you know, what men like, what women like.”

Also on Friday, Epstein’s former housekeeper Juan Patricio Alessi returned to the witness stand to face cross-examination on her testimony that “Jane” and another woman who accused Epstein of having her. sexually assaulted as a teenager were repeat visitors to the Palm Beach mansion, where Maxwell was “the hostess.”

A lawyer for Maxwell sought to discredit Alessi – who worked for Epstein from 1990 to 2002 – by confronting him with testimony from a civil case that the defense said was inconsistent with his testimony at trial.

Alessi said Friday that none of the many young women who visited the Florida home alerted him to any misconduct.

“I wish they had done it because I would have done something,” he said.

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Murder sentence reduced after High Court drug ruling https://trial-jury.org/murder-sentence-reduced-after-high-court-drug-ruling/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 13:57:53 +0000 https://trial-jury.org/murder-sentence-reduced-after-high-court-drug-ruling/

EVERETT, Wash. (AP) – The prison sentence for a man convicted of murder was reduced by more than seven years on Thursday, following a recent decision by the Washington State Supreme Court.

In 2019, a jury found Matthew McGowan guilty of first degree murder for tying Michael Boone to a tree and leaving him to die in the cold at an isolated homeless camp in Everett. He was sentenced to 45 years, the Everett Herald reported.

About a year later, the state Supreme Court overturned Washington’s main drug possession law. The ruling, known as the Blake ruling, rendered one of McGowan’s previous convictions moot, an appeals court ruled.

This changed the range of punishment for McGowan. Under state directives, he faced a minimum of 34 to 45 – the sentence he received. The Blake decision reduced both ends of the range by about three years.

Snohomish County Superior Court Judge Bruce Weiss on Thursday sentenced McGowan to more than 38 years. McGowan’s defense attorney has pushed just under 31 years in prison. A deputy prosecutor has been pushing for over 41 years.

Hundreds of local defendants could gain resentment under the Blake ruling, Snohomish County District Attorney Adam Cornell said Thursday. There are already around 200 convictions pending. That number will only increase, he said.

“It’s going to take years,” said Cornell.

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Valley News – COVID cases postpone Hanover shooting hearing, tangled court files https://trial-jury.org/valley-news-covid-cases-postpone-hanover-shooting-hearing-tangled-court-files/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 02:40:24 +0000 https://trial-jury.org/valley-news-covid-cases-postpone-hanover-shooting-hearing-tangled-court-files/

NORTH HAVERHILL – A two-day hearing in the case of two men accused of shooting a visiting student in Hanover was postponed Thursday after one of the defendants and at least two witnesses tested positive for COVID-19.

And with COVID-19 cases soaring in the twin states, the infections in the shooting case are the latest in a series of challenges for a justice system trying to direct cases to trial during the pandemic.

“I think this is definitely a problem,” said Lebanese lawyer Albert J. Cirone Jr., who served as a Circuit Court judge for 25 years and now mainly deals with inheritance and inheritance law in practice. private. “I think the courts are really struggling.”

Richard Guerriero, attorney for defendant Gage Young and president of the New Hampshire Bar Association, said: as they can.

Guerriero said he has had other cases delayed by COVID-19 cases and noted, “We are doing our best under these circumstances. … Courts do business, it’s just harder to do and it’s slower.

The two-day hearing scheduled for Grafton Superior Court was to focus, in part, on video footage taken by surveillance cameras from four locations in downtown Hanover.

Prosecutors want to use “enhanced” versions of the video to help prove that Young and his co-defendant Hector Correa were in Hanover around the time Thomas Elliott, a student at Providence College, was injured in a shooting in car on November 2, 2018, as he was walking with friends on School Street.

Bruce Jasper, Correa’s attorney, has filed a motion claiming that New Hampshire rules of evidence only allow duplicates of an original recording, and that an improvement should not be considered a duplicate. Guerriero also objected to several pieces of evidence, including video footage, which prosecutors wish to present at trial.

The trial is scheduled for February. Young, 25, and Correa, 20, pleaded not guilty to first degree assault with a firearm, second degree assault with a firearm and reckless driving with a lethal weapon during the shooting. Elliott was shot in the back but recovered. The two defendants were arrested around 90 minutes after the shooting, off Route 10 in Lebanon, after allegedly trying to escape police and crashing into the car they were in. Correa, who police said was driving, was charged with reckless driving with a weapon in connection with the accident; Young has been charged with reckless driving with a deadly weapon and tampering with physical evidence because police claim he threw the gun that was used in the shooting from the vehicle when it crashed.

However, Correa, who is being held at Grafton County Jail, contracted COVID-19 and was held in solitary confinement “with symptoms of sniffles, tasteless and odorless,” Jasper, his lawyer, said in a petition. filed earlier this week looking for a hold. The county jail, which is behind the North Haverhill courthouse, faces an outbreak that as of Monday affected seven inmates and four staff.

“Hearings are probative and the defendant must be present at the hearings to speak with a lawyer, so videoing the defendant will not work,” Jasper said in the file. Additionally, one of Jasper’s family members has a weakened immune system, so he said he was “careful not to create any risk to (the parent’s) health.”

Meanwhile, Deputy County District Attorney Paul Fitzgerald filed a petition that the state lab technician who improved the video and whose testimony should “allay any concerns about the authenticity of the enhanced footage and reliability improvements, “also has COVID-19.

Fitzgerald also filed petitions indicating that a former Lebanese police officer who is on the witness list has COVID-19, and that the wife of another witness linked to surveillance video from a central business Hanover city also tested positive.

Grafton County lawyer Marcie Hornick said by email that the COVID-related delay is “a frustrating thing – of course,” but that the prison has done a good job of curbing outbreaks.

“I don’t know how things are going to evolve as we go along because we always have to deal with a backlog of cases,” Hornick said. “I admit, however, that I remain optimistic that we will no longer have to go into some sort of lockdown – especially with the courts being more tuned in to how to continue trading with the options of ‘online or telephone hearings. “

Susan Warner, head of communications for the New Hampshire Judiciary, said by email that judges will grant motions to continue trials or hearings when attorneys, defendants or witnesses test positive for COVID-19.

“Since the judiciary resumed jury trials in August 2020, there have been several postponements due to COVID-19, although we do not specifically follow specific COVID-19 requests to continue trials or hearings. Said Warner. “Although the prevalence of COVID-19 in the community may cause trials to be postponed, the judiciary is not currently considering postponing trials and / or hearings. “

The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services reported 1,134 new positive test results on Thursday and said there were now more than 8,250 current cases of COVID-19 in the state.

Cirone, the former Lebanese judge, said the courts, like other employers, also grapple with staffing issues and when an extension of a trial or hearings is granted it can be difficult to find the time to reprogram them for the sake of continuity.

“You have to get them back quickly,” he said.

In Vermont, court officials addressed a variety of factors, including HVAC issues at the White River Junction courthouse, which necessitated hearings and jury trials in Windham County in Brattleboro.

Windsor County State Attorney Ward Goodenough said he was aware of a case scheduled for trial last month that was delayed after an accused failed to show up and his lawyer said it was because he had COVID-19.

“For the record, it’s not a common thing,” Goodenough said.

Vermont court officials said Thursday they plan to resume the in-person jury trials at the Orleans County Courthouse in Newport, Vermont, next month.

Two hours later, the Vermont Department of Corrections reported that 16 new cases of COVID-19 had been detected at the Northern State Correctional Facility in Newport. Since the outbreak began on November 10, 40 people in prison and 14 staff have tested positive, DOC said.

John Gregg can be reached at jgregg@vnews.com or 603-727-3217.

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The Court of Appeal confirms the conviction of the former municipal councilor of Lafourche https://trial-jury.org/the-court-of-appeal-confirms-the-conviction-of-the-former-municipal-councilor-of-lafourche/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 16:45:15 +0000 https://trial-jury.org/the-court-of-appeal-confirms-the-conviction-of-the-former-municipal-councilor-of-lafourche/

A state appeals court upheld the conviction of a former Lafourche city councilor accused of falsifying public documents.

The Baton Rouge 1st Circuit Court of Appeal upheld the conviction and sentence of James Bourgeois, who was convicted in 2018 of falsely declaring he was a resident of his district.

Bourgeois was a councilor for District 5, which includes Bayou Blue and parts of Pointe-aux-Chênes and Raceland. According to parish law, candidates for council must have lived in their respective districts for at least one year before the end of the election registration period.

Following:Louisiana Supreme Court restores conviction of former Lafourche city councilor

Bourgeois registered as a candidate on December 2, 2015 and indicated in his documents that he lived at 68 Magnolia Street in Raceland. However, prosecutors alleged that he instead used his Raceland home as a “camp,” where he occasionally hosted crayfish boils, parties and other events, but always returned to a home in Metairie, in the United States. Jefferson Parish.